Marimba

Adventures of Ivan (Khachaturian/arr. Leigh Howard Stevens)

$14.00$17.00

A charming set of six intermediate level works. The musical style is unique in the marimba repertoire: Soviet influenced pictorialism with an Armenian flavored chromaticism.

A charming set of six intermediate level works. The musical style is unique in the marimba repertoire: Soviet influenced pictorialism with an Armenian flavored chromaticism.

Alabama Moon (by G.H. Green/arr. Becker/Kimura)

$21.00$24.00

Alabama Moon was composed (both lyrics and music) by George Hamilton Green in 1920, and quickly published by the Sam Fox Company. Written in the nostalgic style of a southern waltz, the words and melody convey a popular period idiom of the 1920s era.”After a fantastic performance by Bob and Yurika at PASIC 2013 … I’m sure ‘Alabama Moon’ is already on the music stands of many ragtime enthusiasts.”-Percussive Notes

Alabama Moon was composed (both lyrics and music) by George Hamilton Green in 1920, and quickly published by the Sam Fox Company. Written in the nostalgic style of a southern waltz, the words and melody convey a popular period idiom of the 1920s era.”After a fantastic performance by Bob and Yurika at PASIC 2013 … I’m sure ‘Alabama Moon’ is already on the music stands of many ragtime enthusiasts.”-Percussive Notes

Album for the Young (Tschaikovsky/arr. Leigh Howard Stevens)

$17.00$20.00

(New expanded 12-movement edition) A delightful set of programmatic works that achieved standard repertoire status almost instantly when it was first transcribed 25 years ago.

(New expanded 12-movement edition) A delightful set of programmatic works that achieved standard repertoire status almost instantly when it was first transcribed 25 years ago.

Album for the Young I (Schumann/arr. Leigh Howard Stevens)

$11.00$13.00

Marimba music doesn’t get much heavier than the second half of this set. Even the light and simple movements such as Soldier’s March and Wild Rider have a certain Germanic seriousness.

Marimba music doesn’t get much heavier than the second half of this set. Even the light and simple movements such as Soldier’s March and Wild Rider have a certain Germanic seriousness.

Album for the Young II (Schumann/arr. Leigh Howard Stevens)

$11.00$13.00

Marimba music doesn’t get much heavier than the second half of this set. Even the light and simple movements such as Soldier’s March and Wild Rider have a certain Germanic seriousness.

Marimba music doesn’t get much heavier than the second half of this set. Even the light and simple movements such as Soldier’s March and Wild Rider have a certain Germanic seriousness.

Castle Valse Classique (A. Dvorak/arr. Kimura)

$22.00

The name Castle Valse refers to the dance team Vernon and Irene Castle, who were exceedingly popular performers and teachers of all the ballroom dance styles in vogue in the United States during the 1910s and 20s. They appeared with Earl Fuller’s Rector Novelty Orchestra at Rector’s Restaurant in NYC in 1917, a time when Fuller also featured George Hamilton Green in his ensemble.

The name Castle Valse refers to the dance team Vernon and Irene Castle, who were exceedingly popular performers and teachers of all the ballroom dance styles in vogue in the United States during the 1910s and 20s. They appeared with Earl Fuller’s Rector Novelty Orchestra at Rector’s Restaurant in NYC in 1917, a time when Fuller also featured George Hamilton Green in his ensemble.

Castle Valse Classique, Xylo & Mar. Quartet (A. Dvorak/arr. Yurika Kimura)

$24.00

The name Castle Valse Classique refers to the dance team of Vernon and Irene Castle, who were exceedingly popular performers and teachers of all the ballroom dance styles in vogue in the United States during the 1910s and 20s. The Castles’ “hesitation waltz” treatment of Dvorak’s Humoresque became one of their signature numbers, and Green’s spectacular obbligato xylophone performance made the music persuasive enough to stand alone on records.

The name Castle Valse Classique refers to the dance team of Vernon and Irene Castle, who were exceedingly popular performers and teachers of all the ballroom dance styles in vogue in the United States during the 1910s and 20s. The Castles’ “hesitation waltz” treatment of Dvorak’s Humoresque became one of their signature numbers, and Green’s spectacular obbligato xylophone performance made the music persuasive enough to stand alone on records.

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